Saturday, March 23, 2013

Never Again

I am of the opinion that it can be a very dangerous thing to say "Never Again." Saying those two words can end up being like some kind of reverse wish fulfillment. Therefore, there are very few things in life I would be brave enough to make the statement about. But there are a few.


  1. I will never again take a bite of chicken in a restaurant without first checking to see if it has actually been cooked. One case of salmonella in a lifetime is enough for me.
  2. I will never again forward an email without triple checking that I haven't mistakenly hit "reply" instead. Please don't ask...
  3. I will never again turn south onto 3rd Ave. in Kamloops. It turns out 3rd Ave. is a one-way street with all the other cars headed north.
  4. I will never again drive back from a dentist's appointment when drugs have been administered.


All of the above pale in comparison to my final Never Again vow.


     5. Never Again will I live up North.


Many years ago, but still not enough years for the emotional damage to have fully subsided, we lived up North. I realize for many readers of this blog you are under the impression I am currently living "up north." You need to understand that in Canadian terms there is north, and then there is North.

Fort St. John is located on Mile 47 of the Alaska Highway. We lived there for six long, cold years in the 1980s. Many good things happened during those years. Kellen and Rebekah were added to our family, Jay started his career as a regional fisheries biologist there, and I developed a friendship with someone who, to this day, remains one of my best friends.

However, as the Wikipedia article states, Fort St. John is extremely close to a subarctic climate. Winter was long, and it was cruel. When we needed a break from Northerly life we would drive down to Edmonton. To us it seemed like an escape to a tropical paradise. Which leads me to the picture I saw this week that inspired this post.




Proof that one person's trash is another person's treasure. I Googled to see what the driving distance is between Fort St. John and Edmonton. The answer is almost as humorous as the picture: 666 kilometres. I'm not making this up, really I'm not.

On the knitting front I have advanced from a foot to two legs and a torso. More body parts to come...





26 comments:

  1. Oh my. I can sort of relate; my husband and I spent almost eight long years in far northern NY, on Lake Ontario, and the snowfall there is ridiculous. We don't exactly miss it.

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    1. Winter has a way of wearing out a person, doesn't it? The thing about Fort St. John wasn't so much the snow, although we had that too. It was the bitter cold. I don't exactly miss it either. :-)

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  2. I thought it was cold today here with wind chill making it +1C!
    Sarah x

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    1. I have been away from the North for so long now +1C seems cold to me, too. I could never go back to -40C!

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  3. I can't even imagine how cold that would be, here in Lisbon we don't even have snow in winter, although sometimes I wished we have, it really is very beautiful!

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    1. I love Lisbon! I was there many years ago. You live in a beautiful place. I agree that snow is beautiful, and I like seeing it in the winter. But I hated the extreme cold.

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  4. Yikes! I've never been farther north than Toronto and I don't think anyone in my family has lived farther north then Saskatoon--which I've been told is terribly cold in winter. I can't imagine what it was like living and functioning in Fort St. John. It must have taken a real toll to get through the winters.

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    1. Saskatoon can get very cold, too, but I don't think it's quite as bad as Fort St. John. Of course, in my mind nothing could ever be as bad as Fort St. John. Yes, it took its toll. :-)

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  5. oh my!! that does not sound like my kind of place at all! My friends BIL lives in Edmonton and often talks about it being the middle of nowhere...

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    1. Ha! Now you know your friend's BIL isn't in the middle of nowhere. You have to go north another 666 kilometres to be in the middle of nowhere. :-)

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  6. How funny! My son served in the (LDS) Canada Edmonton Mission. He took two turns in Fort St. John (which the young missionaries lovingly dubbed "The John".) Probably six months total, and I think both turns were in the winter. There is north and then there is north. Very true. Another connection. Cue the Twilight Zone theme. :-)

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    1. You will have to show your son the Edmonton poster. He will think it's funny, having spent time there. And yes, The John was a very appropriate nickname. I'm sure I hear the Twilight Zone music in the background. Ha!

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  7. Well, greetings from Grande Prairie, Alberta - but for the snow, today is perfect - bright sunshine and the kind of blue sky that goes on forever. The old timer's joke is that we have 9 months of winter and 3 months of hard mushing!

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    1. Hi! It's nice to hear from someone who is living up North! We used to go to Grande Prairie for day trips when we lived in FSJ. I bet it has changed tremendously since we lived up North. Thanks for stopping by my blog!

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  8. I don't think I could live anywhere else but here. With all the snow and all ;)
    I think the short, but 24 hours of daylight makes up for all the snow and dark during the winter months.
    I browsed through the soll book at the library a few months ago. Maybe I have to borrow it :)

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    1. It should be:
      I think the short SUMMER WITH 24 hours of daylight makes up for all the snow and dark during the winter months.

      Have a great week :)

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    2. I'm sure it is very beautiful where you live - I love seeing your pictures! Yes, do try to borrow the book. I haven't had this much fun knitting something in ages. I can't wait to finish the doll and start in on the accessories.

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  9. I lived in Snow Lake Manitoba (a north of Edmonton and a little south of Fort St. John latitude wise). I loved it, the cold, the snow, the people. After several other few moves, we ended up in Missisauga (outside of Toronto) and I still do NOT like it after many years. The weather in Snow Lake might have been cold, but the people were warm, here, it's the other way around.

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    1. I'm sorry you aren't enjoying where you live right now. I know how hard that can be! Fort St. John was like Snow Lake in terms of the people. Most of them were super friendly. I think it helped that we all shared that common bond of living so far away from family and "civilization."

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  10. Dear me.... I don't blame you on this. I can barely handle winter in the Midwest U.S.

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    1. Winter can be nasty in the Midwest! It might not get as cold as up North, but you can get way more snow.

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  11. Wow, so people actually dare to live in the North?!? I'm annoyed that it will only get to around 60 degrees F here today. I miss several things about Ohio, but winter weather isn't one of them. Of course, I wasn't a knitter when I lived there. I think winter might have been a bit more bearable if I had been!

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    1. Ha! Yes, people actually live in the North. Or maybe I should say survive in the North. And you weren't a knitter when you lived in Ohio? No wonder you moved!

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    2. I know, it's crazy I picked it up after I moved to the Deep South!

      By the way, the doll is adorable! :D

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  12. That poster is hilarious! It reminds me of those sayings going around like "Visit Edmonton....said no one ever!". I lived in BC for a year (Vancouver) and it still remains one of my most favourite places in the world. So I get the reference to the "North" although Edmonton was the place usually referred to as the coldest place on Earth with the big Mall. That is the cutest little doll you are knitting there, look forward to seeing some more body parts. And thank you so much for your well wishes following my little op. Mel x

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    1. Welcome to my blog! I love your saying about Edmonton - somebody needs to make that into a poster, too! Vancouver is lovely. It was a great choice of a place to spend your year in Canada. I'm glad you are feeling better after your surgery. :-)

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