Sunday, August 10, 2014

Bits and Bobs

I think it really is true that as you get older time goes by more quickly. I blinked my eyes and the two wonderful weeks with Rebekah visiting had come to an end and I found myself driving her and Anton back down to Bellingham for their flight home. (Yes, Anton's plane made it the week before, and was even on time. I'm still never flying Allegiant, even if they are giving away free tickets.) Then I checked the calendar this morning and realized August is almost halfway gone. We still have several more rounds of guests coming to stay at our Free B&B before the summer is over, but today is an "in between guests" day, so I thought I better take advantage and do a catch-up post.

Hiking

Last weekend Rebekah, Anton and I hiked to Lindeman Lake. It might sound like I'm exaggerating, but this picture doesn't even begin to do justice to the colour of the water in this lake.


Here's a close-up view of the mountains you can glimpse in the background.


There is a walk in campsite near the lake, and they had the best bear warning sign I've ever seen.


Garden

My garden is making slow but steady progress. The tomatoes are starting to ripen.


 Rudbeckia is in abundance, both at our cottage and in the common areas.


And then there are my peppers. The good news is my Thai chili plant is prolific. There are over two dozen peppers growing on it! The not so good news is they aren't hot. I did some Googling, and have discovered that peppers need to be "stressed" in order to become hot. I had no idea. I thought I was doing them a favour by watering them, but apparently not. I'm now waiting until the leaves look slightly parched before I give the plant a small drink. Hopefully all is not lost, and they will eventually become the hot peppers they were meant to be.


Knitting

Of course there is always knitting happening. I've just cast on something in this gorgeous shade of sky blue. More on this project in a future post.


I'm also working on a Tea With Jam and Bread sweater. This is the project that helped keep me warm that horrible night in Bellingham a few weeks ago when I was waiting for Rebekah's plane. The problem is, the warmth that was much appreciated during that long, cold night, isn't so great a feature on hot summer days. However, the evenings are cooler now, and I have plans to pick it up again this week.


I think that has me caught up with the happenings at the Hammond Cottage. This week Karsten, Diana and Lucy will be here, so I probably won't have a chance to post again until next weekend, but promise lots of great pictures from their visit when I do. How is summer treating you?

44 comments:

  1. Gorgeous views on the hike, I can only imagine what they are like up close. It is amazing August is almost half over, my kids go back to school in one week, where has the summer gone?
    Hugs to you,
    Meredith

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You're the second person today who has mentioned that their kids go back to school next week. That is so different than in Canada. Schools here generally don't start until after Labour Day. It's probably because we feel the need to make the most of every day of warm weather since there are so few of them. :-)

      Delete
  2. The colour of that lake water is unbelievable! It looks like the waters around the Greek islands. And so clear! Absolutely beautiful. It is indeed hard to accept that another summer is nearly gone. Why does summer always seem to go faster than winter? I've seen the odd yellow leaf floating down here already...although the cicadas are singing and it's good and hot today. We also have black-eyed Susans growing wild and the goldenrod has begun to bloom. -- Ruth in Ontario

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Your post made me laugh, Ruth. We live in Canada. Summer is shorter than winter. Maybe not on the calendar, but it certainly is when I open up my front door and step outside. That yellow leaf must be an early adaptor. :-)

      Delete
    2. You're right, of course. I must be in permanent denial over the length of our winters...and last one was a doozie! -- Ruth

      Delete
    3. I think winter denial is a very common Canadian coping mechanism. :-)

      Delete
  3. I notice summer waning when I start to notice it is just getting light when I get up and growing darker in the evening much sooner. The night sounds are different, too. Louder! That lake color looks so inviting! Do you swim in it at all? Or is it much too cold even in August?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I've been noticing the changing light too, Cathy, especially in the evenings. The lake we hiked to was absolutely freezing. Anton went in for about one minute and Rebekah got a little over halfway in. They both said that to be in it for more than five or ten minutes would put someone at risk of hypothermia. There was no way I was going in! I'll stick to walking down to the beach at Cultus Lake and swimming there. It's like a bath tub right now. :-)

      Delete
  4. your views are amazing, so lucky. Our Rudbeckia as good again this year. Thanks for the tip on chillis, it explains alot

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It seems to me the Rudbeckia likes the heat. I guess they aren't that much different than the chilies. Have you had trouble getting your peppers to be hot as well?

      Delete
  5. I hope that you enjoy your next set of visitors and that you have a great time. The lake and mountains are stunning!! What an amazing colours both water and sky are!! I am guessing that you are knitting socks as I think that I see DPN's? Lovely colour yarn whatever you are making though! Have a good week! xx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The next set of visitors includes my granddaughter Lucy, so I'm sure we'll have lots of fun. Socks are a good guess, but it's actually some fingerless mitts I have on the needles right now. :-)

      Delete
  6. What a beautiful spot...youmust get inspiration from the colours around you.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I do get inspiration from the natural beauty I'm surrounded by, Helen. I wish I was better at dyeing yarn. I would love to be able to capture the colour of that lake in a skein!

      Delete
  7. Aquamarine...such s pretty color. I never really appreciated iras my birthstone, but it's beautiful in nature. I didn't know that about peppers either. It makes sense considering that they have always been popular in the southwest. I'm sorry Rebekah's trip passed so quickly. Hopefully it will feel like no time has passed when you see her next.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is a very beautiful colour - it almost looks like someone photoshopped nature. :-) Rebekah won't be back until Christmas, but I'm sure that will be here before I know it.

      Delete
  8. It looks like you've been having a fantastic summer. That lake is just gorgeous! I hope you enjoy the rest of August!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It has been a great summer, filled with lots of activities and visitors. I think it's good I have a few days before the next set arrive. I need to catch my breath! I hope the rest of your summer goes well, too! :-)

      Delete
  9. No wonder your free B&B is so popular - you live in such a beautiful place! Enjoy what is left of summer. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Our B&B has the double attraction of being in a beautiful place and not costing anything. Maybe I should make each guest pay me in yarn. A skein per night! :-)

      Delete
  10. Wow that lake is gorgeous, Kristie. Your area is incredibly beautiful, wherever you venture! Now I must confess I know nothing of the habits of bears (other than they are dangerous) and cannot understand that sign - whatever is the bear doing? Please explain to this little Aussie :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I would be happy to explain the sign. It is showing campers that they need to string their food and garbage (and anything else that has a strong smell) up high so the bears can't reach it. It keeps the bears, campers and food safe. Once a bear becomes used to getting food at a campsite it is very hard to stop it from coming back time and time again.

      Delete
  11. Stunning scenery - I can see why you have so many visitors. Thank you for the tip about the chillies; I too have managed to grow 'heat-free' ones in the past but thought that it was just down to the variety. Enjoy your knitting - cooler weather does have some advantages! x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm glad to hear I'm not the only one who has grown mild chillies. And yes, cooler weather has many advantages, especially if you are a knitter. :-)

      Delete
  12. That is a great bear sign, looks like you have been having a great summer.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It has been a very good summer, in spite of two heat waves. The latest one is due to end tomorrow or the next day, and I have to admit I'm looking forward to a break from watering the lawn and garden.

      Delete
  13. Time is certainly flying past in the blink of an eye the summer is coming to an end and I wonder where the time went. Beautiful views from your hike and your tomatoes are looking delightful.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Another blink of the eye and we'll all be preparing for Christmas. :-)

      Delete
  14. Hmm...that must be why we're so famous for our chile peppers here, I can hardly think of a more stressful environment for them. :) I'm glad you've been having such a good summer. It sounds your time with Rebekah was wonderful. That lake water is incredible, wow! I've never seen water like that. Thank you for sharing. I hope you enjoy the rest of your summer as B&B proprietress. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ha! Yes, New Mexico probably does better in the job of stressing peppers than BC. I like being the B&B proprietress, but the pay is horrible. :-)

      Delete
  15. Stressed peppers? That almost sounds cruel.

    The water in that lake is incredible, is it something to do with the mineral content?

    Hope you're having fun with Lucy x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, it does sound a bit cruel. It also looks cruel. Every time I walk by the poor, drooping plant on the back deck I feel a pang of guilt.

      The water in the lake is fed from a glacier. Most glacier fed lakes are this colour. And yes, it would be from the mineral content. Wouldn't you love to be able to copy that colour in your dye pots?

      Delete
  16. Fascinating about the bears, amazing colours of the water, and such jaggedy mountains! I love hearing about a place so different from mine.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm the same, Freda. Hearing about places that are different from where I live is one of the best things about reading blogs. I'm glad you enjoyed this rather eclectic post. :-)

      Delete
  17. I never knew that about peppers, that's fascinating! Good luck stressing them, maybe you could shout at them! The scenery on your hike looks spectacular, beautiful coloured water.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm starting to feel guilty about the pepper stressing thing. They look so pathetic. Today it's raining and I moved them under the deck covering so they wouldn't get wet. I sure hope this works, or all I'm going to have to show for my efforts is two dozen shrivelled up peppers. :-)

      Delete
  18. The picture of the lake is stunning! I can only imagine how beautiful it is in real life.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It was beautiful but very, very cold! I couldn't do more than put my hand into it, but Anton managed to swim in it for about 30 seconds. :-)

      Delete
  19. Beautiful Scenery! Is that the Cascades ? They look so foreboding or impenetrable or something ! I remember driving through Electric City? Was years ago, scenery was stunning. Love your sweater, I bought that pattern last spring. It's on my to do someday list. What are you knitting it with? Good luck with all your visitors! Chris

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Those are the Coastal Mountains, and while they aren't quite as dramatic as the Rockies they are a close second. You'll like knitting this sweater. It's fast - I would have been done a long time ago, but I set it aside due to the heat wave - and the colour changes for the stripes make it fun. I'm using Cascade 220 worsted and it's working out perfectly in terms of gauge.

      Delete
    2. That's for the yarn info. I like the Cascade 220, lots of nice colours to choose from. That's the hard part sometimes, making a decision. I love that sweater. I envy you your rain in the past day or two, we sure could use a lot here .

      Delete
    3. Oops thanks for the yarn info.

      Delete
  20. Turquoise water, jagged mountains and that blue sky - your landscape is truly stunning, Kristie. Enjoy your next lot of visitors and happy knitting. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The next lot has just left. We had a great time with Lucy. I am really enjoying being a grandparent!

      Delete