Sunday, September 13, 2015

Round Towers and Sinking Ships

Thank you for all of your comments on my last post. There was quite a bit of discussion about the Irish/English breakfast, and I thought I should explain what I meant. The Full Irish breakfast is very similar to the Full English. Really, the only difference between the two is the Irish version includes white pudding. (My apologies for no link. I can't figure out how to link on my iPad.) Typically included are sausages, rashers, eggs, black and white pudding, tomato, mushrooms and toast. Dawn in NL was correct when she said the Irish don't like being confused with the English. That was my mistake. I'll try to remember to take a picture of a Full Irish breakfast and post it next time. Now, on to the last two days. 
We've gone to several sites with round towers. These were built for the protection of the religious communities. If they felt threatened they would go into the tower and close the door. It would have been a good plan until they ran out of food. I don't think they would have had to worry about a water shortage though. Collecting rainwater would have solved that problem, as there seems to be no shortage of that!

The scenery has changed dramatically since my first post. The heather covered hills have been replaced by stunning views of the sea as we wind our way along the southern coast. 
We stopped in Cobh, which went by the name Queenstown at the turn of the last century. It's a colourful little seaside village, and happens to be the final place the Titanic picked up passengers before heading across the Atlantic. We did the Titanic Experience, and it was well worth the admission price. 

This is a replica of a third class passage room. When you go on the tour you are given a "ticket" with the name of a passenger from third class. At the end of the tour there's a display with the names of the third class passengers who boarded in Queenstown, and you check to see if your passenger survived. Not many third class passengers did.

Cobh (Queenstown) is also where some of the passengers from the Lusitania are buried. 
This stone marker was for the Canadian passengers. There were many markers for the victims, some individual, and some for mass graves like this Canadian one. 
Our evening ended on a lighter note. We are staying in a pub in Blarney (no, I'm not kissing the stone!). There was live music last night, so after a wonderful Irish stew we stayed down to listen. It wasn't our first night of enjoying some pub music. A couple nights ago we ate dinner at a pub that had traditional Irish music. It reminded me so much of the music that comes out of Atlantic Canada, especially Newfoundland. Last night's music was different. It was a lone guy on a guitar playing everything from Gordon Lightfoot to Johnny Cash. It was terrific right up until the moment I realized my room was directly above where he was playing! 
Travel Tip #2: If you plan to blog while you are travelling it would be a very good idea to do a trial run with your blogging app before you leave home. I use Blogsy when I'm away and blogging from my iPad. Every other time I have tested it before leaving to make sure it still works and I still remember how to use it. This time I got lazy and figured since I've used it so many times before without a glitch all wMould be well. It's not. So my apologies for any weird formatting, the lack of editing on the photos, and any typos that might appear. 

21 comments:

  1. Lovely photos, it sounds as if you're having a great time. CJ xx

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  2. Sounds like a great time, apart from the room above the music...how did that go?

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  3. Judging by my daughter's experience last year you have have to be a bit of a contortionist to kiss the Blarney Stone. My daughter, who is one-sixteenth Irish, visited Ireland for the first time with her one-quarter Irish boyfriend and had a wonderful time, especially enjoying the late night music! Lovely to see your photos, the scenery is stunning.

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  4. Glad you are having great time. British breakfasts are confusing.... The full Scottish breakfast would include square (Lorne) sausage and black pudding. Not sure about the white pudding. xx

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  5. It sounds like you are having a great time, I love how everyone gets so patriotic about a cooked breakfast, I believe the welsh version contains laverbread. x

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  6. I think you need to go up north and treat yourself to an Ulster Fry, for their traditional breakfast is very different from the other two which pale in comparison :)
    There is a theory that the round towers had another use other than that of protection and that the monks used them for toning.

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  7. It looks like you're having a really good time already. I would love to see the Titanic museum. I'm very interested in the Titanic, and have been as long as I can remember. I have never had an Irish breakfast or an English one but I suspect I would have to share it with someone else because I'm a very light breakfast eater. Tea and toast are good enough. I hope your trip continues to be great, Kristie.

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  8. I just finished reading Dead Wake by Erik Larson. It is a well written and very interesting book about the last voyage of the Lusitania. Well recommended.
    Love your photos.

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  9. Great photos. I like the round tower, and the marker for the Canadians who died on the Lucitania. I'm really enjoying your tour.

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  10. I remember Cobh being so beautiful! I was lucky to be in a car with a local couple who drove me all along the Cork harbour, and it was one of the most amazing places I've ever seen at sunset. Enjoy Blarney! The Mill is overwhelming but there are lots of goods to see. I bought a lambswool blanket there that was my best souvenier!

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  11. Did you ever see a Monty Python skit where a guy was confusing leprechauns as being Scottish , and was sternly shown on the map ... "There's Scotland! There's Ireland. And there's the bloody sea!!"
    Your photos are beautiful, and your adventures are well underway! The Titanic museum sounds really interesting, but probably quite emotional too? Did your ticket holder survive? Kind of a morbid way to see the museum. Enjoying following your holiday!
    Wendy

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  12. Well, now I want to go back and drive around the entire island.

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  13. How fun to hear Gordon Lightfoot played in Ireland! That would have brought a lump to my throat. Do you wear a maple leaf when you travel? The pictures are, of course, stunning - thanks so much for sharing!

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  14. So much history everywhere! The scenery is beautiful. Thanks for letting us tag along on your trip. :D

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  15. Thank you for sharing this journey. I have loved visiting Ireland (for work and vacation) the big breakfasts, all the water and shores, rocks, meadows, plains, creeks, ponds...and I really enjoyed wearing sweaters :)

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  16. The adventure continues - so historically interesting too. The round tower is a curiosity - it doesn't look like it would hold many people! The Titanic museum looks so interesting, and I love the coastal scenery. The Irish breakfast would do me in - enough to keep you going all day!

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  17. We sailed into our Irish holiday past Cobh and it was our first glimpse of this wonderful country! Sarah x

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  18. Love following your adventures!

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  19. Thank you for your lovely pictures. Sounds like a enjoyable trip.

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  20. Beautiful photos Kristen, such a beautiful place to visit. We had that exhibit here in Florida many years ago, I did not survive! Hugs,
    Meredith

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